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Israel’s Defense Export Controls Agency increases restrictions on exporting cyber tech

The Israeli Ministry of Defense has tightened its End User Declaration needed to qualify for an export licence.

The Israeli Ministry of Defense has tightened its End User Declaration needed to qualify for an export licence.

As part of a nationwide push to limit the export of high end cyber capabilities to potential threat actors, the Israeli Ministry of Defense has released a new End User Declaration within the Defense Export Controls Agency to tighten the qualifications for an export licence.

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Under the recent announcements, the agency has updated the declaration regarding the use of the cyber capabilities to include a statement on what the capabilities will be used for.

“The updated declaration implements the policy of the Ministry of Defense to control the end use of cyber systems. The declaration obligates the acquiring state to restrict the use of cyber systems for the investigation and prevention of crime and terrorism. The definition of serious crime and terrorism has been clarified in the declaration,” a release from the Israeli government said.

“The updated declaration also states circumstances under which the use of cyber systems is prohibited, and explicitly specifics the possible sanctions in the event of non-compliance with the obligations set forth in the declaration (including restricting the use of the cyber system or shutting down the system).”

The announcement comes as Israel’s Finance Ministry ran a simulated “war game” to test the resilience of the international finance sector in the face of a cyber attack, with 10 counties participating in the 10-day challenge.

The event, which took up to a year to plan, was informed by data collected on the dark web to simulate an array of cyber attacks resulted in financial chaos.

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According to media outlets, the simulation included representatives from Israel, the US, UK, UAE, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Thailand, the IMF and the World Bank.

Not only did the war game seek to mitigate the fallout of the incidents through enhanced cyber security protocols, but also sought to increase industry level responses to a successful cyber attack. According to Reuters, such financial responses are expected to include targeted bank holidays, debt flexibility and strategic currency manoeuvres.

[Related: Israel’s Finance Ministry runs cyber ‘war game’ to simulate financial sector attack]

Israel’s Defense Export Controls Agency increases restrictions on exporting cyber tech
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