Powered by MOMENTUM MEDIA

Website Notifications

Get notifications in real-time for staying up to date with content that matters to you.

Navy tribute to first female Warrant Officer

The Navy community is mourning the passing of one of the Royal Australian Navy’s most influential sailors, who died aged 82 in Brisbane. Warrant Officer Agnes ‘Lennie’ Maiden was the first woman to be promoted to the highest rank as a senior sailor.

The Navy community is mourning the passing of one of the Royal Australian Navy’s most influential sailors, who died aged 82 in Brisbane. Warrant Officer Agnes ‘Lennie’ Maiden was the first woman to be promoted to the highest rank as a senior sailor.

Maiden served in the Women’s Royal Australian Naval Service (WRANS) for nearly 29 years, from 1956 until 1984, and continued to support the Navy through the WRANS Association during retirement. Minister for Veterans and Defence Personnel Darren Chester said Maiden paved the way for women wanting to serve in the Australian Defence Force.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Lennie was a pioneer for women as she worked her way through the WRANS ranks at a time when the service of women in the ADF was not given the status and credit that it received today,” Minister Chester said. 

“Lennie was a mentor and trainer, and she inspired countless young women to continue careers in the WRANS and other services.”

Maiden was promoted to the rank of Warrant Officer in 1972. Forty-seven years later in 2019 the Navy promoted its first female most senior ranking sailor in the Navy, Warrant Officer of the Navy, Deb Butterworth. Warrant Officer Butterworth said Maiden’s legacy will be remembered. 

“Lennie demonstrated through her devotion to duty that women were fully entitled to be promoted on merit to high rank,” WO Butterworth said. 

“Her rich legacy will be remembered and cherished by those she mentored and served with. The female sailors and officers who work as equals alongside their male shipmates across today’s Navy owe a debt to Lennie and her generation which can never be repaid.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The Royal Australian Navy has changed considerably since Maiden’s days: women were not permitted to serve aboard ships until 1983, and by 1985 the WRANS were integrated into the RAN.

As of October 2019, women make up 21.7 per cent of the Navy’s workforce and can serve in any role.

Vice-Admiral Michael Noonan, Chief of Navy, wrote to Maiden to thank her for her decades of service and her devotion to duty.

“You and your generation of WRANS showed Navy the way forward towards the modern integrated workforce in which every rank and career path is open to all our members,” VADM Noonan wrote.

Navy tribute to first female Warrant Officer
Webpnet-resizeimage_17.jpg
lawyersweekly logo

more from defence connect

Jun 11 2021
Northrop Grumman awarded US Air Force contract for Minuteman III Sustainment
Northrop Grumman Corporation has been awarded a US$287 million base contract by the US Air Force to provide engineering services t...
Jun 11 2021
Athena AI and Anywise to deliver sovereign data-driven sustainment solution
Melbourne-based SME Anywise and Brisbane-based Athena AI collaborate to deliver a sovereign solution for a vision-based Health and...
Jun 11 2021
Australia-Germany to boost Indo-Pacific co-operation
The second Australia and Germany 2+2 Security Policy Consultations between Foreign and Defence Ministries addressed key security a...