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Norway bolsters Seahawk and Super Hercules air muscle

Royal Australian Navy sailors from HMAS Arunta practise conducting a forward transfer with the ship's MH-60R Seahawk helicopter “Athena” while sailing home to Sydney, after completing a successful Indo-Pacific regional presence deployment. Photo: LSIS Susan Mossop.

The US State Department has approved the possible foreign military sale of six MH-60R Seahawk helicopters and support services for four C-130J Super Hercules military transport aircraft to the government of Norway.

The US State Department has approved the possible foreign military sale of six MH-60R Seahawk helicopters and support services for four C-130J Super Hercules military transport aircraft to the government of Norway.

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) notified US Congress of both possible sales on 26 April.

If approved, the first foreign military sale worth around US$1 billion would engage Lockheed Martin as the principal contractor to produce the six helicopters, 15 engines, nine tactical radio systems, GAU-21 50-cal rapid fire machine guns, electronic support measures, support and parts.

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It would also base up to four contractor representatives in Norway full time for the duration and require multiple trips by US government and contractor representatives to Norway.

“The proposed sale will improve Norway’s capability to perform Coast Guard missions along with the ability to perform secondary missions, including vertical replenishment and communications relay,” a DSCA statement said.

“Norway will use the enhanced capability as a deterrent to regional threats and to strengthen its homeland defence.

“Norway will have no difficulty absorbing these helicopters and support into its armed forces.”

If approved, the second foreign military sale worth around US$166 million would engage Lockheed Martin again to deliver continued sustainment and associated services for the four C-130J aircraft past Block 6 through 2028. That support would include Joint Mission Planning Systems, aircraft parts, publications, software, and maintenance.

“The proposed sale will improve Norway’s capability to meet current and future threats by bolstering operational readiness while enhancing air and defence capabilities with a modernised fleet,” the DSCA statement said.

“Norway already has C-130Js and will have no difficulty absorbing these articles and services into its armed forces.

“The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.”

 

Robert Dougherty

Robert Dougherty

Robert is a senior journalist who has previously worked for Seven West Media in Western Australia, as well as Fairfax Media and Australian Community Media in New South Wales. He has produced national headlines, photography and videography of emergency services, business, community, defence and government news across Australia. Robert graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, Majoring in Public Relations and Journalism at Curtin University, attended student exchange program with Fudan University and holds Tier 1 General Advice certification for Kaplan Professional. Reach out via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or via LinkedIn.
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