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DMTC partners with Indigenous cyber security company

DMTC has partnered with Australian Indigenous-owned small business Willyama to undertake a comprehensive cyber security audit of systems to be deployed through DMTC’s Industry Capability Development Program.

DMTC has partnered with Australian Indigenous-owned small business Willyama to undertake a comprehensive cyber security audit of systems to be deployed through DMTC’s Industry Capability Development Program.

Willyama prides itself on conducting a broad range of security and security-adjacent roles, including cyber audits and background checks. While clients landed in recent years have included major multinationals like DXC Technology, the partnership with DMTC builds on a more recent collaboration with Defence. 

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Under the terms of the partnership, the company's team of security analysts will review DMTC's Smart Enough Factory solution – which "seeks to realise benefits of Industry 4.0 adoption for Australian small businesses, and to equip those companies to contribute to defence sector supply chains". 

One key element of DMTC’s Smart Enough Factory is the provision of the "Factory in a Box’" toolkit – a solution that allows business owners to retrofit and integrate low-cost sensors across both modern and legacy equipment. DMTC said that, ultimately, this provides a low-cost entry point for small businesses and a vital early step on the
digital transition journey.

The news builds on increasingly ambitious steps taken by Willyama – which looks to become the "largest employer of Indigenous staff in the federal sector". It also represents the first material move made on the back of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed between DMTC and the Indigenous Defence & Infrastructure Consortium (iDiC) in March.

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"At our conference, I made the point that collaboration isn’t just about signing MoUs or keeping lists of organisations you’ve spoken to,” DMTC chief executive Mark Hodge said.

“It’s doing real work together with a shared purpose. That is true of DMTC’s collaborations with all our partners and it’s certainly true of our involvement with iDiC, so much so that we put it on ourselves not to publicise the MoU until there was something real to show for it."

On its part, iDisaid that it remains hopeful that this contract will prove the "first of many" to come about as a result of the MoU. 

“We have already had opportunities to engage with DMTC through our strategic partner BAE Systems Australia, and also with DMTC’s industrial and research partners,” iDiC CEO Adam Goodes said.

“This contract is great news for Willyama, but with the leadership and drive that Mark and the team at DMTC are showing, we are really confident that it’s just the first of many for our partners.

“We are excited about working alongside DMTC to identify opportunities to demonstrate the expertise and breadth of the Indigenous business sector in Australia.”

 

 

DMTC partners with Indigenous cyber security company
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